University of Wisconsin–Madison
Jacob Witt, Post Grad Trainee

Jacob Witt, MD

Radiation Oncology Resident

Department of Human Oncology

Education

MD, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, (2016)

BS, Washington University in St. Louis, Biology (2012)

Selected Honors and Awards

Missouri State Medical Association Scholarship (2013)

Denardo Summer Scholar (2013)

T35 NIH Training Grant (2012)

Sigma Xi (2012)

Howard Hughes Medical Institute Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (2010)

Washington University Student Associate (2009–2010)

National Merit Commended Scholar (2007)

  • Indications for and efficacy of postmastectomy radiotherapy for patients with a favorable response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Cancer
    Francis DM, Witt JS, Anderson BM
    2018 Dec 03; :
  • Large volume re-irradiation for recurrent meningioma with pulsed reduced dose rate radiotherapy. J Neurooncol
    Witt JS, Musunuru HB, Bayliss RA, Howard SP
    2018 Nov 03; :
    • More

      PURPOSE: Meningiomas comprise up to 30% of primary brain tumors. The majority of meningioma patients enjoy high rates of control after conventional therapies. However, patients with recurrent disease previously treated with radiotherapy have few options for salvage treatment, and systemic interventions have proven largely ineffective. The aim of this study was to determine whether pulsed reduced dose rate radiotherapy (PRDR) was well tolerated in a small cohort of patients with recurrent meningioma.

      METHODS: We retrospectively identified eight patients with recurrent intracranial meningioma treated with PRDR from April 2013 to August of 2017 at a single institution. All patients had radiographic and/or pathologic evidence of progression prior to treatment and had previously completed conventional radiotherapy. Acute and late toxicities were graded based on CTCAE 4.0.

      RESULTS: Of eight patients, six had histologically confirmed atypical meningiomas upon recurrence. All patients were re-treated with IMRT at an apparent dose rate of 0.0667 Gy/min. Median time between radiation courses was 7.7 years. Median PRDR dose was 54 Gy in 27 fractions to a median volume of 261.6 cm3. Two patients (25%) had in field failure with a median follow up of 23.3 months. PFS at 6 months was 100%. All but one (87.5%) patient was still alive at last follow up. No patient experienced grade ≥ 2 acute or late toxicities.

      CONCLUSIONS: PRDR re-irradiation was well tolerated and appeared effective for a small cohort of patients with recurrent meningioma previously treated with radiotherapy. A phase II trial to assess this prospectively is in development.

      View details for PubMedID 30392090
  • Low cardiac and left anterior descending coronary artery dose achieved with left-sided multicatheter interstitial-accelerated partial breast irradiation. Brachytherapy
    Witt JS, Gao RW, Sudmeier LJ, Rosenberg SA, Francis DM, Wallace CR, Das RK, Anderson BM
    2018 Sep 24; :
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      PURPOSE: Studies have shown that an additional mean dose of 1 Gy to the heart can increase the relative risk of cardiac events. The purpose of this study was to quantify the dose delivered to the heart and left anterior descending artery (LAD) in a series of patients with left-sided breast cancer (BC) or ductal carcinoma in situ treated with multicatheter-accelerated partial breast irradiation (MC-APBI) at a single institution.

      METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patients with left-sided BC or ductal carcinoma in situ treated consecutively from 2005 to 2011 with MC-APBI were retrospectively identified. Cardiac and LAD contours were generated for each patient. Cardiac dosimetry and distance to the planning target volume were recorded. Patient health records were reviewed and cardiac events were recorded based on Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0.

      RESULTS: Twenty consecutive patients with left-sided BC treated with MC-APBI were retrospectively identified. Median followup was 41.4 months. Mean equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions delivered to the heart and LAD were 1.3 (standard deviation: 0.7, range: 0.2-2.9) and 3.8 (standard deviation: 3.0, range: 0.4-11.3) Gy, respectively. There was an inverse linear relationship (R2 = 0.52) between heart-to-lumpectomy cavity distance and mean heart equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions. One patient (5%) experienced symptomatic cardiac toxicity.

      CONCLUSIONS: MC-APBI consistently delivers average doses to the heart and LAD that are similar to those achieved in most series with deep inspiration breath-hold and lower than free-breathing radiotherapy techniques. Distance from the heart to the lumpectomy cavity and the availability of other heart-sparing technologies should be considered to minimize the risk of cardiac toxicity.

      View details for PubMedID 30262411
  • Geminin regulates the transcriptional and epigenetic status of neuronal fate-promoting genes during mammalian neurogenesis. Mol Cell Biol
    Yellajoshyula D, Lim JW, Thompson DM, Witt JS, Patterson ES, Kroll KL
    2012 Nov; 32 (22): 4549-60
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      Regulating the transition from lineage-restricted progenitors to terminally differentiated cells is a central aspect of nervous system development. Here, we investigated the role of the nucleoprotein geminin in regulating neurogenesis at a mechanistic level during both Xenopus primary neurogenesis and mammalian neuronal differentiation in vitro. The latter work utilized neural cells derived from embryonic stem and embryonal carcinoma cells in vitro and neural stem cells from mouse forebrain. In all of these contexts, geminin antagonized the ability of neural basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors to activate transcriptional programs promoting neurogenesis. Furthermore, geminin promoted a bivalent chromatin state, characterized by the presence of both activating and repressive histone modifications, at genes encoding transcription factors that promote neurogenesis. This epigenetic state restrains the expression of genes that regulate commitment of undifferentiated stem and neuronal precursor cells to neuronal lineages. However, maintaining geminin at high levels was not sufficient to prevent terminal neuronal differentiation. Therefore, these data support a model whereby geminin promotes the neuronal precursor cell state by modulating both the epigenetic status and expression of genes encoding neurogenesis-promoting factors. Additional developmental signals acting in these cells can then control their transition toward terminal neuronal or glial differentiation during mammalian neurogenesis.

      View details for PubMedID 22949506

 

 

Contact Information

Jacob Witt, MD

600 Highland Avenue,
Madison, WI 53792
Email